Starbucks coffee and The Golden Rule

I recently walked into a Target super store. Like the store always clean and friendly. While I was walking in the store this gentleman walking beside me was holding a cup of Starbucks coffee, Latte, mochachino or whatever, like it was the Holy Grail. He was so very careful with protecting his cup to make sure nothing happened to his $5 cup of jubilus flavors. I thought in my mind,  people are going to laugh and snicker at us in twenty years about our love for coffee and the ever-present Starbucks. I don’t even like coffee but you know we all will be lumped in. Like everyone in the 80’s had bad hair. Mullets in 9th grade are the exception though. 🙂

I think sometimes we put too much importance on things that seem good and worthwhile but do not add intrinsic value.

A few different things come to mind in recruiting and interviewing.

1. Candidates relating experience in interviews that do not help the interviewer decide if they are a good candidate. Nice story though.

2. Asking questions in an interview that do not apply to their character or professional experience. ex. Questions out of a technical book that have no bearing on the technical expertise. I do not remember the books from my econ class in college.

3. Taking the candidate to lunch to see how they interact at lunch. I have never had an offer taken away from a lunch because they slurped their spaghetti. Now if you use the lunch to get to know them on a more personal level, I like this.

4. Overstating the level of competence of the technical group.  Basically unless the candidate can walk on water, they are not interested and if they can walk on water, they still need to juggle while playing hopscotch. Right….

5. Candidates like to brush off relevant experience. If I had a nickel for every time I have heard ” No, not that experience but I can learn it quickly.” I could buy 2-3 gallons of gas. 😦

I know you are not supposed to talk about religion in the workplace, a no-no but I think the “Golden Rule” can really help out a lot. Let’s treat others how we like to be treated-fairly, justly and put aside the irrelevant.

Now let’s break some bread and have a non-fat dirty chi latte and laugh at ourselves.

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In for an inch in for a mile

If you are going to jump in to the deep end of the pool it doesn’t matter if it is 6 feet deep or 600 feet deep, either way it  is deeper than my head at age 11. As a child the deep end was always the scary end. It held the mystery and danger. I grew up in Virginia and Utah but moved to Arizona at 11. In Phoenix everyone has a pool and for good reason. I still remember on those 120+ degree days cooking an egg on the sidewalk.

Before I knew how to swim I use to jump in the deep end at my neighbor’s pool and grab the side for dear life as I plummeted towards the bottom of the pool. I thought I was crazy and dangerous. Now I realize how crazy jumping in the deep end was without the knowing how to swim. I was 11 and happy to live the “crazy” life. Shortly thereafter, I realized how important, and how much fun it was to swim. In fact the swim is my favorite part of the triathlon.

Recently I had the opportunity to do something that was outside of my comfort zone. The opportunity presented itself and I took it. I realized that I was jumping into the pool without knowing how to swim but at least this time I fully realize how crazy it is and that I need to learn how to “swim” quickly. You know what they say “go big or go home”. So in for an inch, in for a mile.

My crazy factor has diminished a lot  from those days in Arizona as I sit here and eat my Reduced Fat “Wheat Thins”. I wonder what my  11-year-old self would have said but at least I hope I can get a head nod from my new leap of faith.

So I am fully invested and look forward to the ride wherever it takes me.

Use it or Lose it

I often talk to clients and when they say they need to hire a candidate they inevitably tell me they need a candidate who can hit the ground running. With the limit on money and resources they need someone who can do the required tasks with minimal supervision.

I often say the that the perfect candidate is the one that just left. That is the candidate that can perform the tasks at 100%.

Over the years I have started to see that getting the person that closest resembles the job description may not always be the best choice. The best choice maybe a technically strong, great communicator with initiative that has to something to gain by choosing the company.

I know that may sound backwards.  The benefit needs to be mutually beneficial.  A win for both employee and employer. what happens in 12-18 months passes and the person does not feel that they have a place to grow and flourish. They start looking for another opportunity.

I had a candidate yesterday that turned down the job because it was a lateral move. He was looking to improve his skills. He was looking for the opportunity to stretch his technical skills.

He did not want to lose the technical skills he had so hard to gain. His technical skills would start to dwindle.

I like to work out but I do not like to work out on “Legs” day. I know that since I do not squat, lunge, or leg press that often that when I do my muscles have started to lose some of their strength.  My muscles have started shrink or have gone into a basis muscle atrophy.

Per Wikipedia when you muscles go into atrophy it “decreases quality of life as the sufferer becomes unable to do certain tasks or worsen the risks of accidents while performing those”. Those things you do not use you lose.

We have all heard the saying “use it or lose it”.

That saying applies in muscles and knowledge. When looking for that right candidate you can think about today but make sure the long-term benefit will be a good fit as well.

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